15 results for author: Medical Missions Foundation


India 2019 – Namaste

The traditional greeting of India literally means the divine in me recognizes the divine in you. Our team in India will be saying that a lot in the coming week.   After months of recruiting, planning and most recently packing, Team India is ready to head to Bhopal, India for Medical Missions Foundation’s fourth mission to India. We will again partner with Sewa Sadan Eye Hospital - if it were not for our incredibly generous hosts, this mission would not be possible.   During this mission we will provide much needed surgical care to the people of Bhopal and the surrounding rural villages. Along with medical treatment, we will ...

Uganda 2016 – Remembering and sharing

On Saturday, November 5th, 47 days after our Uganda Team got back from their mission, they reunited for a special occasion. Stories, pictures, memories, and inside jokes were shared of a shared experience that accomplished great things. 63 volunteers, 16,294 air miles, 190 surgical procedures, and 1,532 clinic visits-- numbers that definitely showcase a successful medical mission.   Check out this video created by our mission photographer, Brad Miller, capturing the beautiful community, the inspiring culture, the hard work, and the heroic people who make it all possible.   THANK YOU to all our volunteers and partners! &n...

Five Things I’ve Learned from Accidentally Starting a Handwashing Program

By Barclay Martin Original version of the post appears on globalhandwashing.org.           I never set out to run a handwashing initiative. In fact, this whole project started because I love music, culture and people. What began as a simple idea for a week of art projects bloomed into a completely new story of health and empowerment, which continues to this day. In honor of Global Handwashing Day, I want to share five things I’ve learned that have helped the Wash Project grow beyond my imagination.   1- Don’t bring answers -- bring questions I began this journey as part of a medical ...

Urban Plunge – Volunteer today!

Each year, Medical Missions Foundation volunteers travel around the world to take part in a rewarding experience to share their time and talent to provide healing to under served communities. Now, there is an equally rewarding opportunity right here in Kansas City for medical and non-medical volunteers. You can help change the world without getting on an airplane and by volunteering right here in your city.   Medical Missions Foundation and First Hand Foundation have collaborated to offer a mission opportunity in Kansas City's urban core during June and July of 2016. We will be offering free wellness screenings and limited evaluations ...

Philippines 2015

In February of 2015, Medical Missions Foundation partnered with World Outreach Foundation and several Philippines’ based organizations to complete a mission at Ormoc District Hospital in Leyte.   A 40 foot container of equipment, supplies and instruments was delivered prior to the start of the mission. The group worked long hours to serve 2037 patients. There were 56 major and 72 minor surgeries completed. In the clinic, the practitioners saw 1191 patients and the dental personnel completed 545 extractions and fillings. The eye team dispensed 205 pairs of reading glasses as well. One of the largest efforts was screening for diabetes ...

Taking the Plunge

Medical Missions Foundation conducted its first local mission on Friday, July 31st, 2015 at St. Therese Little Flower. Urban Plunge, a day of free screenings for low-income Kansas City children and adults, was a collaboration between Medical Missions Foundation and Cerner’s First Hand Foundation. Volunteers performed dental, vision, and hearing screenings in addition to physicals from doctors.     By the end of the day, volunteers had screened 37 individuals in total, of which 18 were adults and 19 were under the age of 18. One mother remarked to volunteers that without Urban Plunge’s free screenings, she would have had to take her ...

Say Hello to Daniel

Today I met with Daniel Isaias Xep Tuiz, another of our friends here at the hospital. He is the hospital's Radiology Technician. Daniel has a sincere desire to help people, and that is absolutely evident as you see him work and offer his help to patients and to us.   Daniel was born here in San Lucas, and lives here with his parents and eight siblings. He has five brothers and three sisters, as well as a nephew. When he was born, he had a sickness for which his parents sought treatment. To do so, they sold many things to be able to pay for the treatment, and he was cured. He wants to help others in the way that the medical treatment ...

San Lucas – Friday/Last Day in the OR

Today is our last day here at the hospital. It is always a hard day. We know, however, that it will not be long before we can come back and continue the work once again. We wrapped up the week with 64 patients seen, and 71 procedures performed. I believe I can freely speak for everyone here when I say that it has been such a privilege to be here and to do the work that has been done this week. This team of doctors, nurses, practitioners, students, and volunteers is top-notch. They have done great things here this week, and are proud to continue the work that Medical Missions Foundation is all about. Many whom have not been here previously have told ...

Meet Jonathon

Today I got a chance to interview another very interesting person in San Lucas Toliman. His name is Jonathan Gelez, and he is a translator who has been working with the Medical Missions Foundation team at the hospital with us all week. He has translated for the staff and patients here, as well as helping Cindy Rudolph with a health education skit she does with “Chicky” the sneezing chicken, as I mentioned in another post. He has done an excellent job with this, especially at the school today with the children. He did very well at the head of the classroom, helping to teach the children about how to prevent the spread of germs.    ...

San Lucas Toliman – Thursday

With everything we are able to do, probably the most rewarding are days like today. We started the day with a little 5-year-old boy with phimosis, which has been a problem for him since birth. A few moments in the operating room and his problem was solved. The second pediatric case was a one-year-old little girl whose mother brought her in for a mass on her scalp. It was originally thought to be a cyst, but on careful surgical exploration we believe it to actually be an unclosed portion of her skull. She will follow up with Dr. Tun, who will watch her closely and we expect a full recovery.   Several of us, including Cindy, Jonathan (our ...