12 results for author: Katherine Herrick


Antigua 2018: Photo Gallery

Our week went by very quickly and successfully! In total, our group performed 75 surgeries. Our urology team did 41 procedures and our ENTs did 34. Audiology met with 173 patients. They did 111 hearing evaluations, fit 148 hearing aids for 140 people and adjusted hearing aids for returning patients.   We'd like to thank our OR staff and ENT group who didn't get a chance to be featured on the blog this week. They all did phenomenal work, and we wouldn't have been able to accomplish what we did without their help.   If you'd like to see more photos from our trip, you can access them through the Dropbox links from our photographers ...

Antigua 2018 – Anesthesiologists: They Never Get Tired of Sleeping

Our anesthesiology team has been working with all the patients at Las Obras this week to prepare each person for surgery. They work across all teams, and they usually see around 100 patients by the end of the week, according to Dr. Terry. “Our goal is to make people comfortable,” he said.   In addition to helping patients get through their surgeries comfortably, our anesthesiology volunteers have also been taking time to reflect on what brought them here this week. Some of them have had their own battles in the hospital that got them involved in medicine, and others have come so many years that they’ve made special connections with ...

Antigua 2018 – Patience & Patients

Our team members working in the recovery room have been helping patients wake up on the right side of the hospital bed this week as they trickle in after surgery.   The volunteers in the recovery room, or Post-Anesthesia Care Unit, make sure each patient is as comfortable as they possibly can be after their operations. “We help people wake up, and we help control their pain,” said Dr. Steve.   Since surgeries have started, our PACU team has been checking patients’ blood pressure as they wake up, making sure patients can wiggle their fingers and toes as anesthesia wears off, keeping an eye on kids who had tonsillectomies for ...

Antigua 2018 – Audiology (Ear)drums Up Patients

Our audiology group has been swiftly moving through their patients this week. So far, they’ve seen 87 patients in total, performed 51 hearing tests and fit 61 people with hearing aids.   Many of the patients this year are returning for checkups, and some need replacement hearing aids that have been ruined by ash from Fuego’s eruption. Most patients are receiving just one hearing aid this week for the ear they struggle to hear with the most, and some of them might return next year for a second one if needed.   Some members on this year's team chose to pursue audiology because of their own experience with hearing aids. ...

Antigua 2018 – Urine for a Treat

Team Urology is one of our veteran groups of doctors on the Antigua mission – this is Dr. Scott’s ninth trip, Dr. Marc’s eighth and Dr. Tom’s fifth. But even for veterans, some cases are pretty rare for them to handle in Guatemala. Today all three physicians worked together, along with medical student David, to do a nephrectomy. This is a common procedure for each urologist to do in the U.S., but it hasn’t been done on our group’s mission to Antigua since 2011.   In the U.S., a nephrectomy isn’t very invasive. The whole surgery can be completed laparoscopically, which only requires a small incision. But in Antigua, our doctors ...

Antigua 2018 – Welcome to Las Obras!

After a long day of traveling on our flights that left dark and early, our team arrived safely at our hotel in Antigua. So far, nobody seems to have had any issues with the air quality from the volcanic eruptions, but we’ve brought masks for our volunteers that they can choose to wear just in case. There is ash on the ground between the cobblestones, but that’s really the only effect we’ve seen so far.   This morning we began work at Las Obras Hermano Pedro Hospital. Our medical staff met with patients in the clinics, and tomorrow will pick up as surgeries begin. This year we have specialists in urology, audiology, anesthesiology and ...

Antigua 2018 – Mission Memories

Our volunteers are anxiously awaiting our 21st mission to Antigua next week – emphasis on the anxious this year with all of the news about Fuego’s volcanic eruption. As of right now, no plans for the trip have changed, but we’re carefully watching the news to make sure we will be able to safely carry out the mission. This year we have 49 volunteers joining us, and many of them are experienced from past trips in Antigua. As we are coming at a very difficult time, we would like to share a few of the happy memories and positive experiences some of our previous volunteers have had in Antigua to remember the importance of a mission like this. &n...

¡Muchas Gracias!

We would like to thank our wonderful trip coordinators Pam and Deb Nicklaus. They have organized this mission for the past five years and kept everything running smoothly. They are like the moms of the entire group and watch out for every person and take care of any needs our team members might have. We will certainly miss them watching out for all of us next year, but luckily they are passing the responsibility to the Weissend family, who we don’t doubt will hold everything together just as gracefully.

Labor of Love

Some of our team members with us on our mission this week may be joining us in Antigua for the first time, but are not by any means inexperienced missionaries. Carly Skjervem and her husband Brady are here this year for their first medical mission, but have been on several other trips around the world to help people in need through their church. They have visited an orphanage in South Sudan and went to Haiti to help construct homes. Although they loved lending a hand in building homes for people, Carly and Brady felt they could be even more helpful by getting involved in health related missions. Carly attends Graceland University in Independence and ...

Gracious Guatemalans

The people of Guatemala have given our team such a warm welcome into their country. Yesterday afternoon a patient returned to the hospital to personally give one of our urologists, Dr. Marc Milsten, a few gifts to thank him for his service. This figures shown are to bring him luck for his dining table and car. Our doctors have been very impressed with how tough the people here are, and how well they handle their surgeries with far less pain relief than we have in the United States. Many of our Art Team members have also made several new friends and received dozens of hugs and kisses from children and their families. We feel very fortunate to be ...